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Tree Browser

With these characteristics: None

Mulberry, Red

Morus rubra

Moraceae - Mulberry

Description

Leaves: Alternate; simple; nearly orbicular; 3" to 5" long; deciduous; variable in shape; no lobes or up to 3 to 5 lobes; coarsely serrate margin; acute to acuminate apex; hairy beneath; light yellow fall color; petiole 1/2" to 1" long.

Twigs/buds: Twigs slender; somewhat zigzag; red-brown to green-brown; showing milky sap when cut.  No terminal bud; lateral buds ovoid, pointed, 1/4" long, light brown.

Flowers/fruit: Polygamo-dioecious.  Flowers small and inconspicuous with no petals.  Multiple fruit of small drupes; resembles a blackberry; dark purple or nearly black; 1/2" to 3/4" long; juicy; ripening in June or July.

Bark: Thin; dark brown to orange-brown; scaly and furrowed; bark of roots yellow.

Wood: Sapwood yellow; heartwood yellow-brown; growth rings distinct; ring-porous; rays plainly visible to naked eye; little used but excellent firewood.

General: Native to most of the eastern U.S.  Usually found on rich, moist sites, but can stand considerable heat.  Shade tolerant.

Landscape Use: Mulberries are good city trees that grow fairly rapidly.  They need attention to branch structure and attachment to keep them healthy and well-formed.  The broad, round canopy and shiny, bright green leaves are very attractive.  Be sure to plant all-male trees if you do not want fruit.  Zones 4-9.

Comments & Limitations:  Fruit and/or plant part can be nuisances; use fruitless varieties if possible.

Characteristics

General

Family:
Moraceae - Mulberry
Cultivar Availability:
No
Hardiness Zone:
4-9
Type:
Broadleaf
Utah Native:
No

Growth

Growth Rate:
High
Mature Height:
High
Longevity:
Medium
Is Good Under Power Lines:
No
Crown Shape:
Rounded

Ornamental

Bark:
No
Fall Color:
No
Flowers:
No
Foliage:
Yes
Fruit:
No

Tolerence

Shade:
Low
Salt:
High
Drought:
High
Poor Drainage:
High
Alkalinity:
High
Transplanting:
High