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With these characteristics: None

Pinyon or Colorado Pinyon

Pinus edulis

Pinaceae - Pine

Description

Leaves: Needles in groups of 2; sometimes newest needles appear to be borne singly, but separate into 2s when squeezed gently; 1" to 2" long; fairly stiff; yellow-green; evergreen, remain on tree 3-9 years.

Twigs/buds: Twigs fairly stout; orange to brown colored.  Buds small, oval, brown.

Flowers/fruit: Monoecious.  Fruit a woody cone with very short or no stalk; 1" to 2-1/2" long; oval to round; reddish- brown; scales few and not tipped with a prickle; seeds wingless and large, about 1/2" long, thin-shelled, edible.

Bark: Fairly thin; ridged.

Wood: Unimportant except for firewood and occasionally fence posts; fairly hard.

General: Native throughout most of southern, central, and eastern Utah at mid-elevations; and throughout the southwestern U.S.  The fruit (seed) is an important food for certain southwestern Indians.  Grows on dry sites, often mixed with junipers.  Shade intolerant.

Landscape Use: Seldom planted though could do well on dry sites.  Sometimes present as native trees in housing developments--trees in this situation often do poorly due to over-watering and root damage; pinyons in these situations also pose a fire hazard.  Zones 4-8.

Characteristics

General

Family:
Pinaceae - Pine
Cultivar Availability:
No
Hardiness Zone:
4-8
Type:
Conifer
Utah Native:
Yes

Growth

Growth Rate:
Low
Mature Height:
Medium
Longevity:
High
Is Good Under Power Lines:
Yes
Crown Shape:
Rounded

Ornamental

Bark:
No
Fall Color:
No
Flowers:
No
Foliage:
Yes
Fruit:
Yes

Tolerence

Shade:
Low
Salt:
Medium
Drought:
High
Poor Drainage:
Low
Alkalinity:
High
Transplanting:
Medium