Skip to main content

Tree Browser

With these characteristics: None

Willow, Hankow ('Globe Navajo', etc.)

Salix matsudana 'Navajo'

Salicaceae - Willow

Description

See also Peachleaf Willow description.

Leaves: Alternate; simple; bright green above, paler beneath; narrow-lanceolate; 2" to 4" long, 1/4" to 1/2" wide; deciduous.

Twigs/buds: Twigs yellowish when young, becoming yellowish-green to greenish-brown with time; hairless.

Flowers/fruit: Flowers dioecious; little information available about flowers.

Bark: Yellowish initially, becoming yellowish-green to brown when mature.

Wood: Information unavailable.

General: Native to China.  Very popular large tree because of its broad, evenly rounded canopy.  Like many other willows, grows fast but is short-lived.  May be insect and/or disease prone, especially when stressed.  Weak wood and/or branch structure.  Prefers abundant water.  Rarely should be planted, though limited use in specific situations may be justified.

Landscape Use:   Tougher and hardier than many willows, and thus overused in Utah and the West.  Rounded form and bright green leaves are nice from far away, but weak wood and susceptibility to slime flux and other disease and insect problems mean it should be planted less.  Zones 4-9.  Many other cultivars and hybrids of Hankow willow also exist and some are planted in Utah.  An example is 'Golden Curls', a hybrid between S. alba var. 'Tristis' and S. matsudana var. 'Tortuosa' that has strongly curled and slightly weeping stems.

Cultivar: 'Navajo'.

Characteristics

General

Family:
Salicaceae - Willow
Cultivar Availability:
Yes
Hardiness Zone:
4-9
Type:
Broadleaf
Utah Native:
No

Growth

Growth Rate:
High
Mature Height:
Medium
Longevity:
Low
Is Good Under Power Lines:
No
Crown Shape:
Rounded

Ornamental

Bark:
No
Fall Color:
No
Flowers:
No
Foliage:
Yes
Fruit:
No

Tolerence

Shade:
Low
Salt:
High
Drought:
Low
Poor Drainage:
High
Alkalinity:
High
Transplanting:
High